The Joyous Meditation Teachings of Lorin Roche


OM - a word of solemn affirmation and respectful assent, sometimes translated by " yes, verily, so be it


Pranava refers to OM
om
óm [p= 235,3] [L=40704]
( √av Un2. i , 141 ; originally o = ā , which may be derived from ā BRD. ), a word of solemn affirmation and respectful assent , sometimes translated by " yes , verily , so be it " (and in this sense compared with Amen ; it is placed at the commencement of most Hindu works , and as a sacred exclamation may be uttered [but not so as to be heard by ears profane] at the beginning and end of a reading of the vedas or previously to any prayer ; it is also regarded as a particle of auspicious salutation [Hail!] ; om appears first in the upaniads as a mystic monosyllable , and is there set forth as the object of profound religious meditation , the highest spiritual efficacy being attributed not only to the whole word but also to the three sounds a , u , m , of which it consists ; in later times om is the mystic name for the Hindu triad , and represents the union of the three gods , viz. a (viṣṇu) , u (śiva) , m (brahmā) ; it may also be typical of the three vedas ; om is usually called praava , more rarely akara , or ekākara , and only in later times okāra) VS. S3Br. ChUp. &c
235,3] [L=40704.1]
om at the beginning of their vidyā aakarī or mystical formulary in six syllables [viz. om mai padme hū] ; according to T. om may be used in the following senses: praave , ārambhe , svīkāre , anumatau , apā*ktau , asvīkāre , magale , śubhe , jñeye , brahmai ; with preceding a or ā , the o of om does not form vddhi (au) , but gua (o) Pa1n2. 6-1 , 95.)
(H1) ind.
[p= (Buddhists place



okāra
ó--kāra [p= 236,1] [p= 235,3] [L=40705]
(o-k°) the sacred and mystical syllable om , the exclamation om , pronouncing the syllable om Mn. ii , 75 ; 81 Katha1s. Bhag. &c , (cf. vijayokāra , ktokāra)
ó--kāra [p= 236,1] [L=40705.1]
a beginning , prosperous or auspicious beginning of (e.g. a science) Ba1lar.
ó--kāra [p= 236,1] [L=40705.2]
N. of a liga
(H3) m.
(H3) m.
(H3) m.




om

(H1) óm [p= 235,3] [L=40704]
ind. ( √av Un2. i , 141 ; originally oṃ = āṃ , which may be derived from ā BRD. ), a word of solemn affirmation and respectful assent , sometimes translated by " yes , verily , so be it " (and in this sense compared with Amen ; it is placed at the commencement of most Hindu works , and as a sacred exclamation may be uttered [but not so as to be heard by ears profane] at the beginning and end of a reading of the vedas or previously to any prayer ; it is also regarded as a particle of auspicious salutation [Hail!] ; om appears first in the upaniṣads as a mystic monosyllable , and is there set forth as the object of profound religious meditation , the highest spiritual efficacy being attributed not only to the whole word but also to the three sounds a , u , m , of which it consists ; in later times om is the mystic name for the Hindu triad , and represents the union of the three gods , viz. a (viṣṇu) , u (śiva) , m (brahmā) ; it may also be typical of the three vedas ; om is usually called praṇava , more rarely akṣara , or ekākṣara , and only in later times oṃkāra) VS. S3Br. ChUp. &c
[L=40704.1]
(Buddhists place om at the beginning of their vidyā ṣaḍakṣarī or mystical formulary in six syllables [viz. om maṇi padme hūṃ] ; according to T. om may be used in the following senses: praṇave , ārambhe , svīkāre , anumatau , apā*kṛtau , asvīkāre , maṅgale , śubhe , jñeye , brahmaṇi ; with preceding a or ā , the o of om does not form vṛddhi (au) , but guṇa (o) Pa1n2. 6-1 , 95.)





Meditating with a Mantra: OM and ardha-matra



Vijnanabhairava, or Divine consciousness: a treasury of 112 types ... - Page 149
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Jaideva Singh - 1979 - 173 pages - Preview
Artha : Object, goal, sense, perfect comprehension of reality, ardhacandra : Lit ., demi-lunai; the second stage in the ardha- matra (half of a mora) in the japa or recitation of Aurh; subtle energy of sound. ..
books.google.com

Language in South Asia - Page 208
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Braj B. Kachru, Yamuna Kachru, S. N. Sridhar - 2008 - 608 pages - Preview
... A revealing saying current among Sanskrit scholars is ardha-matra-laghavena putrotsavam manyante vaiyakaranah "If a grammarian can save as much as half a mora in the formulation of his rule, ...
books.google.com


Mantra & meditation
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Usharbudh Arya - 1981 - 237 pages - Snippet view
where the mantra simply flashes from within and a stillness occurs, you are now touching that half-measure syllable, ardha- matra, which is the silence experienced beyond the 'm 'of Om. It is ...
books.google.com

Vāc: the concept of the word in selected Hindu Tantras - Page 163
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André Padoux - 1990 - 460 pages - Google eBook - Preview
... forty-nine or fifty in number, may be considered as arranged into eighty-one padas or ardha- matras, half-morae.215 214. ... have but one matra each, hence 25 4 semivowels and 4 spirants with one matra, hence 8 4 yamas, jihvamuliya, ...
books.google.com



Higher Psychical Development Or Yoga Philosophy - Page 71
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Hereward Carrington - 2003 - 320 pages - Preview
There is another very well-known mantra, used a great deal, and that is simply a repetition of the word aum with tat ... (the bird Hansa's) right wing; U, its left; M, its tail, and the Ardha-matra (half- metre) is said to be its head. ...
books.google.com

OM Chanting and Meditation - Page 29
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Amit Ray - 2010 - 116 pages - Preview
While chanting, keep in mind that a complete Om sound has four parts, that is, “ O” + “M” + Humming sound of “M”, which is known as “ardha-matra” + Silence. If you are new to Om chanting, it will be better if the “O” part is longer than ...
books.google.com

Encyclopaedic Dictionary of Puranas: (A-C) ; 2.(D-H) ; 3.(I-L) ; ... - Page 923
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Swami Parmeshwaranand - 2001 - Full view
The constitutents of Pranava are explained thus; Akara is Brahma, Ukara is Visnu , Makara is Rudra and Ardha Matra is the Pararh Brahma. In short, the Pranava is the combination of the trinity, which, taken as a whole, is Pararh Brahma. ...
books.google.com